@natgeo

National Geographic @natgeo

Experience the world through the eyes of National Geographic photographers.

https://on.natgeo.com/instagram

Photo by @paulnicklen | Just minutes old, a newborn elephant seal pup opens its eyes for the first time to greet its new world of ice, snow, and wind in South Georgia, Antarctica. At birth, elephant seals weigh approximately 50 pounds, but within three weeks, this little guy may reach an astonishing 400 pounds from feasting on its mother's rich milk. Once her young is large enough to fend for itself, the mother will wean the pup and head back out to sea, replenishing her own depleted resources. Follow me @PaulNicklen to see more images of animals at the start of their lives, as they learn to cope with the wild's unpredictability and the beautiful new worlds they are born into. #ElephantSeal #Pup #TurningTheTide #ExtinctionEndsHere
@natgeo

Photo by Michael Yamashita @yamashitaphoto | The Mekong Delta is a huge network of river tributaries that far outnumber roads. This aerial view from 1992 shows five canals at a confluence in Phung Hiep, Vietnam. You can get a glimpse of the floating market (lower right), beginning to form in the early morning hours. Unfortunately, because of the combined effects of climate change, dams, and sand mining of the river, 300,000 people have left the region over the past few years—they can no longer sustain their livelihoods due to the dwindling waterways. #phunghiep #HauGiang #mekongdelta #Vietnam #climatechange
@natgeo

Photo by Fritz Hoffmann @fritzphotos I Tibetan Buddhist monks from the Labrang Monastery in Xiahe, China, shoulder a large
@natgeo

Photo by @laurakmorton | Virtual-reality beach volleyball is played at the Augmented World Expo in Santa Clara, California. The volleyball game was being used to demonstrate the StarTracker VR technology, which uses reflective stickers that can be stuck to the ceiling or a net while an upward-looking camera calculates the position of the subject from the stickers. This is an outtake from an @natgeo story on Silicon Valley culture. For more photographs of people, places and culture in California and beyond follow me @laurakmorton.

Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.
@natgeo

Photo by @beverlyjoubert | It’s really not surprising that words often fail to capture the wonderful extraordinariness of the natural world. Take the wildebeest (or gnu, if you prefer): an oddball assemblage of hooves and horns, weirdly sloped, generously maned and bearded, and rounded off with a horse’s tail. Gather them into a crowd, and the word herd simply won’t suffice. Now imagine a dusty, churning, bleating multitude of wildebeest powering their way across the grasslands in one of the most epic animal migrations on Earth. Thankfully, we can do better than
@natgeo

Photo by @katieorlinsky | Goats in Uvs Province, Mongolia, during a 2018 dzud, the Mongolian word for a winter famine. A dzud occurs when extremely cold weather leads to massive livestock die-offs that threaten the lives and livelihood of Mongolia’s large population of nomadic herders. Warming weather and a lack of rain in the summer are becoming more common each year in Mongolia, which has led to less hay being available for the animals to gain the weight they need to endure the brutal winter. With cold winds coming from Siberia, temperatures drop to below -50°C. Animals can't graze, and freeze or starve to death.
@natgeo

Photo by @edkashi | A farming family poses in the misty rain in Rwanda. I photographed them while working on a film about reconciliation and the power of photography, February 1, 2020. 
#camerakidsfilm #rwanda  #africa #rurallife #rain
@natgeo

Video by @bertiegregory | A male dugong feeds on seagrass in the southern Red Sea. Dugongs are closely related to manatees, and they look similar, especially from this angle. Their bottom halves, however, are very different. The manatee has a paddle-shaped tail; dugongs have a fluked tail, like dolphins. It’s thought that because of this tail, dugongs inspired the stories of mermaids! The fish in this shot are juvenile golden trevally. They hang out with dugongs to snatch any invertebrates spooked up by the disturbance. Follow @bertiegregory for more on these awesome animals. #redsea #dugong #diving #underwater #ocean
@natgeo

Photos by @babaktafreshi and Miguel Montargès, @esoastronomy | Look at the top-center in this view of the winter sky, taken on a recent trip to Oman, to find Betelgeuse! This bright orange star in the iconic constellation Orion that marks the hunter’s shoulder has puzzled astronomers—and recently dimmed to 1/3 of its usual brightness. This massive star is a red supergiant near the wild end of its life: a coming supernova. Although it's 700 light-years away, when this happens its brightness could rival the full moon in our night sky, and even be visible during the day! 
Swipe left to see a news-breaking fuzzy image of Betelgeuse, captured with one of the world’s largest telescopes, the VLT in Chile. With stars' far distance and our atmosphere disturbing their image, we can't easily reveal them, even with giant telescopes. Betelgeuse is now reversing to normal brightness after an unusually deep excursion in its natural 430-day periodicity. No one knows why Betelgeuse has dimmed, but the new image shows the star no longer looks round and uniform. We don't know when Betelgeuse will become a supernova. It can be any time, from tonight to some point during the next 100,000 years. For more astronomy and space photos, follow me @babaktafreshi. 
#betelgeuse #orion #astronomy #supernova @esoastronomy
@natgeo

Photo by David Guttenfelder @dguttenfelder | A cartoon depicting North Korea's Unha-3 test rocket launch hangs on a hallway wall at a children's hospital in North Korea's Pyongyang. 
Please follow me, @dguttenfelder, for an inside look at North Korea, where I have been traveling and photographing for the past 19 years.
@natgeo

Photo by @michaelnicknichols | Bujumbura, Burundi, 1989. 
Primatologist Jane Goodall (@janegoodallinst) and I were on a mission to expose humans' hypocrisy with the natural world, which we saw as most evident with chimpanzees. Though chimps are 98 percent the same as us in terms of shared DNA, they get none of our rights. This small chimpanzee that still should have been under his mother's care in the wild was chained by the neck to an abandoned shower. He was kept as a pet, as entertainment. After I made the image, he was liberated by Jane’s institute and lived briefly with other chimpanzees in a sanctuary. He died of liver disease, probably from the whiskey he was given to entertain his owners. 
Our mission resulted in several @natgeo magazine articles and ultimately a book called
@natgeo

Photo by @amivitale | Keepers from the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary (@r.e.s.c.u.e) in northern Kenya take elephants Shaba and Pokot out for one final walk at Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy, prior to their reintroduction into the wild. Rescued as young calves, Shaba had been cared for by @r.e.s.c.u.e for three years and Pokot for two. The team had grown very close to both. This final walk was a way to say goodbye before the elephants were transferred to nearby Sera Wildlife Conservancy for their release (along with Mpala, not pictured) on November 16. All are doing well and have successfully reintegrated into one of the nearby wild herds. Their ease in returning to the wild is a testament to the hard work of the team at @r.e.s.c.u.e, the first ever community owned elephant sanctuary in all of Africa.
Follow @amivitale and @r.e.s.c.u.e to learn more.
@conservationorg @kenyawildlifeservice @nrt_kenya @sandiegozoo @tusk_org @thephotosociety @natgeoimagecollection @photography.for.good #protectelephants #elephants #stoppoaching #kenya #worthmorealive
@natgeo